We know shockingly little about many of the conveniences we rely on in modern life.

The cars we drive, the trains we ride, the smartphones into which we type our most sensitive personal data — for most of us, their inner workings are pure mystery.

The same goes for our birth control. Questions abound about the tiny pills — or patches, or condoms, or intrauterine devices — that we count on to sidestep unwanted pregnancies.

Many people have obsessively Googled questions like these, along with other reproductive health queries.

Google no further. The Lily’s video series, “When Used Correctly,” has answers for you. These seven videos from 2018 explore everything from the origins of the IUD to what it’s like to get the arm implant. We’ve rounded them all up for you to revisit your favorite episodes — or to binge the whole season if you’ve never seen them before.

Episode 1: Cyberchondria

“Cyberchondriac” is now an actual word in the Oxford Dictionaries. Women tell us the last reproductive health question they Googled, and an expert tells us which sites we can trust.

Episode 2: How much do you know about contraception?

We asked women to answer these five contraception questions. Watch to see how they did — and to learn what the real answers are.

Episode 3: I got the arm implant

Two women talk about the Nexaplanon arm implant: what insertion was like, the side effects and more.

Episode 4: The surprising history of the IUD

Do you have an IUD? If you were born in the 1950s, you might’ve had the Dalkon Shield. It killed at least 20 women and caused many other complications. See what it looked like, along with the Lippes loop and other early contraceptive devices.

Episode 5: A key innovation in how we use the pill today

From the “dial” design to push packs, the way we use birth control pills today is thanks to innovations that date back to the 1960s.

Episode 6: Lorelai, Elaine and contraception

Washington Post video editor Nicki DeMarco uncovers the many methods of approaching birth control on television.

Episode 7: A breakup over birth control

Post editor Lisa Bonos was in a new relationship that had more potential than any other in recent years. Until they had an argument about birth control that changed everything.

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