If you missed the Oscars on Sunday night, we’ve got you covered. From history-making women winners to a surprise best actress award, here are the eight biggest moments for women from the show.

1. In an upset, Olivia Colman wins best actress

This seemed like Glenn Close’s year. Even though “The Wife” wasn’t exactly a box office hit, the adaptation of the Meg Wolitzer novel by the same name was all but assured to earn Close her first win (it was her seventh nomination). She consistently walked away from every other awards show with gold, and her speech at the Golden Globes was deemed by many as “show-stopping.”

Olivia Colman reacts as she accepts the award for best performance by an actress in a leading role for “The Favourite.” (Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)
Olivia Colman reacts as she accepts the award for best performance by an actress in a leading role for “The Favourite.” (Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)

But when the time came Sunday night, Olivia Colman came away with the best actress award for her work in “The Favourite.” Even she seemed surprised, accepting the speech with weepy eyes and mouth agape, saying of winning, “It’s genuinely quite stressful. This is hilarious.” She closed out her speech with the equally humble, touching and funny line: “My kids, if you’re home and watching — well, if not, well done. But I sort of hope you are. This is not going to happen again.”

2. “Period. End of Sentence.” brings attention to menstrual equality

“I’m not crying because I’m on my period or anything," producer Rayka Zehtabchi said when “Period. End of Sentence.” won the trophy for documentary short subject.

“I can’t believe a film about menstruation just won an Oscar.”

Besides possibly winning the opening line of the night, Zehtabchi and fellow producer Melissa Berton talked about the impact of making the film, which explores the stigma around menstruation that women face in rural India. “A period should end a sentence, not a girl’s education,” Berton said.

3. Tiny Fey, Amy Poehler and Maya Rudolph steal the stage

As you may have heard, the Oscars went hostless for the first time in 30 years, and it was … completely fine? Maybe even better than with a host? The show moved along at a delightfully swift pace, and even had a sorta-kinda monologue from Tina Fey, Amy Poehler and Maya Rudolph, who presented best supporting actress at the beginning of the telecast.

From left, Maya Rudolph, Tina Fey, and Amy Poehler speak onstage at the beginning of the show. (Kevin Winter/Getty Images)
From left, Maya Rudolph, Tina Fey, and Amy Poehler speak onstage at the beginning of the show. (Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

They offered jokes that they would have told if they had been hosts:

Rudolph: “Hey, Chadwick Boseman, Wakanda plans do you have later?”

Poehler: “These Spanx are so tight they’ve entered my spider-verse.”

Fey: “Now everyone, look under your seats. You’re all getting one of those cheese sandwiches from the Fyre Festival!”

4. Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper deliver heated performance of “Shallow”

Hot. Smoldering. Intimate. These aren’t words usually employed to describe any aspect of the Oscars, but they were all used Sunday night. The duo performed their hit song “Shallow” from “A Star is Born” with one caveat: Cooper would be Cooper, not his iconic character, Jackson Maine. He did just that, at one point sauntering over to Gaga as she belted out her crescendo and sitting down next to her. The two stared at each other with visible affection as they finished the song together, and things got a little heated — or perhaps uncomfortable — for viewers at home.

5. Lady Gaga’s pep-talk acceptance speech

After Gaga and Cooper’s steamy performance of “Shallow,” the ballad — written by Gaga, Mark Ronson, Andrew Wyatt and Anthony Rossomando — won best original song, and Mother Monster broke down as she started her speech. After she thanked her family and Cooper (“There’s not a single person on the planet that could have sang this song with me but you”) she directed her words to all the other dreamers out there.

“If you are at home and you’re sitting on your couch, and you are watching this right now, all I have to say is that this is hard work. I’ve worked hard for a long time,” she said. “It’s not about winning. But what it’s about is not giving up. If you have a dream, fight for it. There’s a discipline for passion, and it’s not about how many times you get rejected or you fall down, or you’re beaten up. It’s about how many times you stand up and are brave, and you keep on going.”

6. The women behind “Black Panther” make history

This year’s ceremony was marked by several historic firsts, led by the women behind “Black Panther’s” technical categories. Ruth E. Carter became the first black costume designer to take home an Oscar. Hannah Beachler became the first African American to win for production design. Their historic wins also make them the first black women to win in non-acting categories since Irene Cara won for best original song (“Flashdance... What a Feeling”) in 1984.

“Marvel may have created the first black superhero, but through costume design, we turned him into an African king,” Carter said in her acceptance speech. Beachler looked to the future while accepting her award. “I give the strength to all of those who come next, to keep going, to never give up.”

Ruth E. Carter accepts the award for best costume design for “Black Panther.” (Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)
Ruth E. Carter accepts the award for best costume design for “Black Panther.” (Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)

And “Black Panther” wasn’t the only film to make Oscars history. In addition to becoming the first Marvel superhero film to win an Oscar, “Spiderman: Into the Spider-Verse” led co-director Peter Ramsey to become the first African American to win an Oscar for animated feature film. He was also the first African American to be nominated in the category.

7. Barbra Streisand makes an appearance

In one of the telecast’s more politically charged moments, Barbra Streisand showed up to introduce “BlacKkKlansman” (not, oddly, “A Star is Born,” even though she appeared in a past iteration of the film). Streisand clearly adored Spike Lee’s movie, gushing about how she tweeted her admiration immediately after seeing it for the first time — which led to a conversation with Lee about Brooklyn and their own personal fashions.

Barbra Streisand introduces “BlacKkKlansman.” (Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)
Barbra Streisand introduces “BlacKkKlansman.” (Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)

What did she like so much about it? That it was truthful, and “truth is especially precious these days,” she said.

8. Regina King beats out Amy Adams for best supporting actress

In recognition of Amy Adams’s talent, she’s been nominated for six Academy Awards, including five for supporting actress (“Junebug,” “Doubt,” “The Fighter,” “The Master” and “Vice”) and one for actress (“American Hustle”). Adams lost for the sixth time Sunday night when she was bested by Regina King, who hit gold on her first nomination for her work in “If Beale Street Could Talk,” an adaptation of a James Baldwin novel by the same name. (Glenn Close, a fellow nominee, has been be in the running seven times.)

“To be standing here, representing one of the great artists of our time, James Baldwin, it’s a little surreal,” King said, while crying. She then directed her speech toward her mother, saying, “Thank you for teaching me that God is always leaning, always has been leaning in my direction.”

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