International Women’s Media Foundation (IWMF) announced Eloisa Lopez of the Philippines as the winner of this year’s Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award.

The award, which honors female journalists who document underreported stories in challenging or underserved areas around the world, was established in honor of Anja Niedringhaus, a German AP photojournalist who was killed in Afghanistan in 2014.

This year’s applicants, from which Lopez was selected, were the most geographically diverse since the program’s inception. Two honorable mentions were also awarded: Mary Calvert of the United States and Tasneem Alsultan of Saudi Arabia.

Mary Calvert, left, and Tasneem Alsultan.
Mary Calvert, left, and Tasneem Alsultan.

“Anja consistently met a high standard of both courage and technical excellence, and that pairing is evident in each of the portfolios from Eloisa, Mary and Tasneem. We look forward to seeing what’s to come from these women in their bright futures,” said IWMF executive director Elisa Lees Muñoz.

Based in Manila, Lopez’s work focuses on human rights, women and religion.

After receiving the award, Lopez said from Manila, “Coverage on the drug war is subsiding but people are still dying; it’s becoming normal. Elevating the voices of those left behind is critical now more than ever.”

Selected works from Eloisa Lopez:

Siblings and friends of 13-year-old Aldrinne Pineda mourn over his casket during his funeral on March 14, 2018 in Tondo, Manila. Pineda was killed by a policeman who allegedly fired his gun accidentally. Pineda is only one of the dozens of children killed over the two-year course of the Philippine government’s war on drugs; President Rodrigo Duterte has repeatedly called the children who died “collateral damage.” (Eloisa Lopez)
Siblings and friends of 13-year-old Aldrinne Pineda mourn over his casket during his funeral on March 14, 2018 in Tondo, Manila. Pineda was killed by a policeman who allegedly fired his gun accidentally. Pineda is only one of the dozens of children killed over the two-year course of the Philippine government’s war on drugs; President Rodrigo Duterte has repeatedly called the children who died “collateral damage.” (Eloisa Lopez)
A candle is left on the crime scene where Alvin Jhon Mendoza, 23, was killed on Oct. 12, 2016, in Manila. Mendoza was shot from behind by unidentified motorcycle-riding gunmen while having dinner in a canteen near his home. As of November 2018, the Philippine government claims at least 5,050 civilians have been killed by police under President Rodrigo Duterte’s anti-drug campaign, while human rights groups estimate at least 20,000 deaths, including those perpetuated by unidentified assailants. (Eloisa Lopez)
A candle is left on the crime scene where Alvin Jhon Mendoza, 23, was killed on Oct. 12, 2016, in Manila. Mendoza was shot from behind by unidentified motorcycle-riding gunmen while having dinner in a canteen near his home. As of November 2018, the Philippine government claims at least 5,050 civilians have been killed by police under President Rodrigo Duterte’s anti-drug campaign, while human rights groups estimate at least 20,000 deaths, including those perpetuated by unidentified assailants. (Eloisa Lopez)
A pregnant Elizabeth Navarro, 29, cradles her baby during the wake of her 5-year-old son Francis and husband Domingo Mañosca, who were shot and killed by a masked gunman in their home in Pasay City, Philippines, on Dec. 11, 2016. The gunman, who aimed through the window, missed the older Mañosca in his first bullet, hitting the minor on his forehead. According to the family, Mañosca was a drug user for five years but had stopped since the launch of the government’s anti-drug campaign. (Eloisa Lopez)
A pregnant Elizabeth Navarro, 29, cradles her baby during the wake of her 5-year-old son Francis and husband Domingo Mañosca, who were shot and killed by a masked gunman in their home in Pasay City, Philippines, on Dec. 11, 2016. The gunman, who aimed through the window, missed the older Mañosca in his first bullet, hitting the minor on his forehead. According to the family, Mañosca was a drug user for five years but had stopped since the launch of the government’s anti-drug campaign. (Eloisa Lopez)
Mothers, widows and relatives of drug war victims in Manila raise their fists as they remember their slain loved ones during a program dedicated to victims of extrajudicial killings ahead of All Souls Day in October 2018. Below them are portraits of drug war victims, the majority of whom have unresolved cases. (Eloisa Lopez)
Mothers, widows and relatives of drug war victims in Manila raise their fists as they remember their slain loved ones during a program dedicated to victims of extrajudicial killings ahead of All Souls Day in October 2018. Below them are portraits of drug war victims, the majority of whom have unresolved cases. (Eloisa Lopez)

Selected works from Tasneem Alsultan:

In 2015, two brothers, their cousin and a friend decided to volunteer to secure their neighborhood mosque. As ISIS had already identified the mosque as a target, the four men knew the risk of losing their lives was high. Yet they volunteered to help save the lives of the 600 men praying that Friday noon. When ISIS attacked, the four men died after running toward the attacker. The brothers’ mother publicly celebrated the life of her two sons and nephew. During the men’s commemoration ceremony, which was held by 200 women, the audience was struck by her courage. A woman who had just lost her sons and nephew insisted on encouraging other mothers to raise their sons and daughters to be selfless in the face of ISIS, to unite in order to not be conquered. “I don’t believe the terrorists were Sunni. They’re not Muslims. They can’t be. It’s a plan, you know,” the woman said. “First they’ll attack a few Shia mosques and tomorrow they will attack Sunni mosques to spark hate between us. You wait and see.” (Tasneem Alsultan)
In 2015, two brothers, their cousin and a friend decided to volunteer to secure their neighborhood mosque. As ISIS had already identified the mosque as a target, the four men knew the risk of losing their lives was high. Yet they volunteered to help save the lives of the 600 men praying that Friday noon. When ISIS attacked, the four men died after running toward the attacker. The brothers’ mother publicly celebrated the life of her two sons and nephew. During the men’s commemoration ceremony, which was held by 200 women, the audience was struck by her courage. A woman who had just lost her sons and nephew insisted on encouraging other mothers to raise their sons and daughters to be selfless in the face of ISIS, to unite in order to not be conquered. “I don’t believe the terrorists were Sunni. They’re not Muslims. They can’t be. It’s a plan, you know,” the woman said. “First they’ll attack a few Shia mosques and tomorrow they will attack Sunni mosques to spark hate between us. You wait and see.” (Tasneem Alsultan)
Hessah Alajaji takes to the road in Saudi Arabia hours before the ban on female drivers was officially lifted in June 2018. She drove to McDonald’s. (Tasneem Alsultan)
Hessah Alajaji takes to the road in Saudi Arabia hours before the ban on female drivers was officially lifted in June 2018. She drove to McDonald’s. (Tasneem Alsultan)

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