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This week:

A 6-year-old Salvadoran is reunited with her mother, “Killing Eve” actress Sandra Oh makes history, and how Doris Ho-Kane is documenting Asian and Pacific Islander women in history.

Pussy Riot claims responsibility for World Cup protest

A protester is dragged off the field in Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow. (Maxim Shemetov/Reuters)
A protester is dragged off the field in Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow. (Maxim Shemetov/Reuters)

Before France beat Croatia to win its second World Cup championship on Sunday, forward Kylian Mbappe high-fived a woman who had run onto the field wearing a police uniform. A total of four people — three women and one man, according to the Associated Press — interrupted the game before they were tackled by officials, dragged off the field and taken to a police station. Shortly after the incident, Pussy Riot, a Russian feminist punk protest group, claimed responsibility for the protest and posted a video that captured the World Cup moment.

In a statement on social media, the group said the demonstration was meant to draw attention to people who are being arrested or jailed unjustly for political reasons. They mentioned Oleg Sentsov, a Ukrainian filmmaker who opposed Russia’s annexation of Crimea in 2014. Sentsov was sentenced to 20 years in prison on terrorism charges, which he denies.

In London, women tell Trump he’s not welcome

(Niklas Hallen/AFP/Getty)
(Niklas Hallen/AFP/Getty)

On Friday in London, women led a march protesting President Trump, who met with NATO leaders, British Prime Minister Theresa May and Queen Elizabeth II in Europe last week. The theme of the women’s march was “bring the noise,” and the event drew thousands of participants. Using instruments, megaphones and pots and pans, demonstrators made noise that was “symbolic of women’s power,” marcher Lucy O’Brien told the Guardian. Referencing Trump, she added: “We are telling that misogynist that he is not welcome here.”

The day before the march, Trump told the Sun, a British newspaper, that May had ignored his advice on Britain’s exit from the European Union, placing a bilateral trade deal with the United States in jeopardy. (The president later backtracked, calling May an “incredible woman” at a news conference on Friday.) He also criticized London’s mayor, Sadiq Khan, for allowing protesters to fly a giant “Trump baby” blimp. Trump also accused Khan of being weak on terrorism and crime.

At Wimbledon, Angelique Kerber sees her ‘dream come true’

(Clive Mason/Getty)
(Clive Mason/Getty)

Angelique Kerber defeated Serena Williams at Wimbledon on Saturday, giving Germany its first singles title at the tournament since Steffi Graf beat Arantxa Sanchez Vicario in 1996. “It’s just a dream come true,” said Kerber, who now holds three Grand Slam titles.

Kerber defeated Williams 6-3, 6-3, earning applause from everyone – including her American opponent. “She’s an incredible person, and she’s a really good friend,” Williams said of Kerber. “I know she’s really going to enjoy it and enjoy the moment.” This is Williams’s first Grand Slam championship since returning to the women’s tour earlier this year. She gave birth to her daughter, Olympia, in September.

Set to portray a transgender man, Scarlett Johansson drops out of project

After considerable backlash, Scarlett Johansson has dropped out of the film “Rub & Tug,” in which she was set to portray Dante “Tex” Gill, a transgender man known for running a massage parlor and prostitution ring in Pittsburgh in the ’70s and ’80s.

“While I would have loved the opportunity to bring Dante’s story and transition to life, I understand why many feel he should be portrayed by a transgender person,” Johansson said in a statement reported by Out.com, “and I am thankful that this casting debate, albeit controversial, has sparked a larger conversation about diversity and representation in film.”

Chinese poet Liu Xia goes into exile

Liu Xia at an airport in Helsinki. (Jussi Nukari/Reuters)
Liu Xia at an airport in Helsinki. (Jussi Nukari/Reuters)

Chinese poet Liu Xia, who spent the better part of eight years under house arrest in China while her husband, Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo, died in jail, flew to exile on Tuesday. Photographers captured her in Helsinki, where she was in transit to Germany.

In a letter published last year, Liu Xia, 57, wrote she was “going mad” in her isolation, according to the AFP news agency. “Too solitary,” the note read, “I have not the right to speech / To speak loudly / I live like a plant / I lie like a corpse.”

Over the last year, the European Union and the United States have urged Chinese President Xi Jinping to allow Liu to leave the country, asserting she had never been charged with a crime. News of her release came just a day after German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang met in Berlin.

6-year-old Salvadoran returned to mother as reunification process continues

Salvadoran Alison Jimena Valencia Madrid’s voice became famous last month when ProPublica published audio of the 6-year-old begging for a phone call after being separated from her mother at a Border Patrol detention facility. On Friday, Jimena was reunited with her mother, Cindy Madrid, who had been kept in a detention facility in Texas for about a month. The two left El Salvador to escape gang violence, Madrid told ProPublica.

On June 26, a federal judge in San Diego ordered the Trump administration to reunite children affected by its “zero tolerance” immigration policy within 30 days. U.S. District Judge Dana M. Sabraw had given officials until July 10 to return 103 children under age 5 to their parents. In a report filed with the court on Thursday, federal officials said they could not return 45 of the 103 children for safety reasons or because their parents were deported or in criminal custody. One parent could not be found.

In a recent study published in Public Understanding of Science, researchers Inoaka Amarasekara and Will Grant analyzed 23,005 comments made on science-related videos on YouTube. Amarasekara told the New York Times she manually divided the comments into one of six categories: positive; negative or critical; hostile; sexist or sexual; appearance-based; and neutral or general discussion.

“I was quite disappointed by the time I’d gone through them,” Amarasekara told the Times. “I could see why people would not want to be on YouTube.”

Although women creators received slightly more positive comments than men for their YouTube content, commenters were more likely to criticize the hosts’ appearance or make sexist remarks if the host was a woman.

(BBC America/AP)
(BBC America/AP)

Last week, Sandra Oh was nominated for an Emmy for her portrayal of M15 officer Eve Polastri in BBC America’s “Killing Eve.” It made her the first woman of Asian descent to be nominated for best lead actress in a drama. In an interview with Vulture’s E. Alex Jung, Oh said she reacted “joyously” to the news, which she discovered while with fellow actor Michelle Krusiec.

“I understand that people are going, ‘Oh my God, it’s 2018. [What] is taking the world so long?’” Oh said. “I understand that. But I am not there. I am just like, ‘yay.’ ”

This is Oh’s sixth individual Emmy nomination: For five consecutive years, she was nominated for best supporting actress in a drama for her role as Cristina Yang on ABC’s “Grey’s Anatomy.”

(Mark Ho-Kane)
(Mark Ho-Kane)

Doris Ho-Kane is the founder and curator of 17.21 Women, an Instagram account dedicated to showcasing Asian and Pacific Islander pioneers. The name 17.21 Women comes from the amount of space Asia takes up in the world: 17,212,000 square miles. Ho-Kane’s collection of images range from historical shots of activists marching in San Francisco’s Pride Parade in 1989 to tear sheets from magazines featuring stars like Tamlyn Tomita of “Joy Luck Club” fame. In addition to her full time job as a pastry chef, Ho-Kane started curating the online platform shortly after the 2016 presidential election in an effort to amplify the stories of strong Asian and Pacific Islander women throughout history.

Where did you find archival photos of the Asian women you feature, along with their role in history?

Google, library and university archives, and my own small collection. As a Xennial (baby Gen X’er/grandma millennial), growing up in a suburb of Dallas, I truly had to venture outside of my familiar environment to see beyond the whitewashed history written in our school textbooks.

I first heard about Yuri Kochiyama from a queer Asian American feminist I met at a punk club called Moon Tunes in the late ’90s. From there, I was really motivated to learn more about Asian American history, namely about trailblazing women. In a way, growing up in the suburbs of Texas instead of a big city like New York, forced me out of complacency. I became an activist at a relatively early age. I like to say that I was educated via microfiche and by enlightened gutter punks.

How do you ensure that the photos you post are inclusive of all types of Asian women?

I try my absolute best to be inclusive, but it’s not always easy as a one-woman team. I just need more time and the resources to get there. I would love to make 17.21 my full-time job.

There are so many incredible Asian-Pacific Islander [women], and all of their stories deserve to be heard. I recently wrapped up a series of posts for Pride Month, but I highlight extraordinary queer women throughout the year. I’ve covered East Asian, Southeast Asian and South Asian women. As time goes on, I intend to delve into all 17.21 million square miles of Asia and all of the islands, to honor women from across the Asian diaspora.

What plans do you have for the future of 17.21?

I’ll continue posting to Instagram, but in the long run, I would love to establish a physical archival space, publish a weighty book version of 17.21 to recognize our past, and a biannual print magazine to represent our present. A proper show in a gallery space would be amazing. Producing films is another facet I’m into exploring. Last fall, 17.21 hosted an intimate, casual dinner and gathered an incredible group of trailblazing Asian American women. I’d like to do another event but open it up to everyone.

My ultimate goal would be for these women and their stories to go from marginalized to mainstream. For Nasreen Mohamedi’s art to be as recognized as Agnes Martin’s, for aviator Lee Ya-Ching (李霞卿) to be mentioned in the same breath as Amelia Earhart, and for the Filipino-fronted American rock band Fanny to be revivified per David Bowie’s request. We need to amplify these important voices before time and indifference bury them again.

“She’s nothing like Agnes Martin! If you don’t know the history of colonialism, independence and post-partition, if you don’t know where Nasreen comes from, you have no idea what informs the volcanic change in her work. You don’t understand that this woman was extraordinarily radical.” —Sheena Wagstaff, chair of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s modern and contemporary division 〰️ Nasreen Mohamedi (1937–1990), one of the most important artists to emerge in post-independence India/one of the early brick-layers of Indian Modernism/associated with American minimalist artists such as Agnes Martin and John Cage/Constructivism and Suprematism also informed her work/studied at Central Saint Martin’s in London (1954-57) and worked in Paris until 1970s/professor at renowned M.S. University, Baroda from 1972–1988/inspired by Sufism, Zen Buddhism, yoga, the poetry of Rilke and Camus, Indian classical music, Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Islamic design, and the modernist architecture of Le Corbusier's Chandigarh/exhibitions at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Met Breuer, MoMA, Tate Liverpool, Kiran Nadar Museum of Art in New Delhi, Talwar Gallery, and documenta in Kassel, Germany/although Huntington’s Disease would ravage her muscle coordination, her mind refused to give up, Nasreen used her architect’s drafter to manage involuntary movements and draw, and precision instruments to go about geometric abstract designs/passed away long before the world of Indian art turned global and was relatively unknown outside of India, but in the last decade her work has been the subject of international revitalization [Continued ⬇️]

A post shared by 17.21 WOMEN (@17.21women) on

Terry Nguyen, Washington Post multiplatform production intern

Just Float On flare jeans

If you’re still looking for that standout closet item to attract compliments (or at least admiring stares), Free People’s Just Float On flare jeans are your best bet. Every time I wear them, I feel like I’m making literal power moves as I glide across the office. I’ve always loved a good dramatic flare, but my petite frame usually precludes me from the trend. These jeans just so happen to come in short (three colors), regular (nine colors) and long (two colors). Plus, if you need to further adjust the length, just take a scissors to the bottom and you won’t even notice a difference from the original hem.

—Andrea Platten, Washington Post multiplatform editor

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