We're moving! Get our latest gender and identity coverage on washingtonpost.com.

Discussion of news topics with a point of view, including narratives by individuals regarding their own experiences

Since the protests in response to the killing of George Floyd in police custody started in Minnesota on May 25, I have been receiving random texts from non-Black and White friends who have taken the time to apologize for not valuing me in their life sooner.

I understand the intentions behind this, but it comes off as needing me — a Black person — to absolve them of their White or complicit guilt. Instead, they need to actually do the work to dismantle white supremacy within their own communities. After Oluwatoyin Salau was found dead on June 15, I became more frustrated with these messages because I still do not feel seen by these people.

Black women, Black trans women and gender noncomforming individuals are being killed at alarming rates. And instead of a sense of urgency to protect my life, some people seem to be more concerned in being portrayed as a good person.

When my plants wither, it feels like a reflection of my own setbacks

Taking care of myself and my plants can be an uphill battle

Kate not Katie: Why I dropped the ‘i’ in my name

As I got older, my name started to feel like a too-small sweater

My parents’ divorce stopped me from being the kid I wanted to be. Here’s how I healed.

I realized every family has their own story, and this is mine