For her historic remarks as the first woman elected vice president, Sen. Kamala D. Harris (D-Calif.) wore white — an enduring symbol of the suffrage movement that won women the right to vote a century ago.

As soon as Harris walked onstage to “Work That” by Mary J. Blige, viewers immediately noticed her pearl-colored pantsuit paired with a glossy top and American flag lapel pin.

“White, once the color of women’s purity, now the color of female power,” tweeted New York Times investigative reporter Jodi Kantor.

Women have dressed in white before as an emblem of history: During President Trump’s State of the Union address last year, many of the female lawmakers wore white.

Saturday night, Harris spoke about being a first among women; a daughter of Jamaican and Indian immigrants, she is now the highest-ranking woman in politics in the nation’s history.

“While I might be the first woman in this office, I won’t be the last,” Harris said, “because every little girl watching tonight sees that this is a country of possibilities.”

With most abortions illegal in Texas, crisis pregnancy centers see an opportunity

Crisis pregnancy centers are largely faith-based and explicitly antiabortion in their mission

Rep. Terri Sewell’s voting rights bill just passed the House. Meet the Black women who paved her way.

As Women’s Equality Day is celebrated, the legacy of Black women’s fight for voting protections lives on

Adela Raz spent her career representing the Afghan government. What she feels now is ‘beyond pain.’

The 35-year-old assumed the role of Afghan ambassador to the United States only a month ago