For her historic remarks as the first woman elected vice president, Sen. Kamala D. Harris (D-Calif.) wore white — an enduring symbol of the suffrage movement that won women the right to vote a century ago.

As soon as Harris walked onstage to “Work That” by Mary J. Blige, viewers immediately noticed her pearl-colored pantsuit paired with a glossy top and American flag lapel pin.

“White, once the color of women’s purity, now the color of female power,” tweeted New York Times investigative reporter Jodi Kantor.

Women have dressed in white before as an emblem of history: During President Trump’s State of the Union address last year, many of the female lawmakers wore white.

Saturday night, Harris spoke about being a first among women; a daughter of Jamaican and Indian immigrants, she is now the highest-ranking woman in politics in the nation’s history.

“While I might be the first woman in this office, I won’t be the last,” Harris said, “because every little girl watching tonight sees that this is a country of possibilities.”

The Hyde Amendment and abortion: Why it’s in the news and what you need to know

Here’s more on the history of the amendment, what it does, and what activists on both sides have to say about it

For this 24-year-old, fighting for Palestinian rights is ‘the most core part of my identity’

Lea Kayali is one of many Palestinian women continuing a long-held tradition of fighting for liberation

There has never been an antiabortion law like the one just passed in Texas

The state is seen as a ‘testing ground’ for new kinds of antiabortion bills