For her historic remarks as the first woman elected vice president, Sen. Kamala D. Harris (D-Calif.) wore white — an enduring symbol of the suffrage movement that won women the right to vote a century ago.

As soon as Harris walked onstage to “Work That” by Mary J. Blige, viewers immediately noticed her pearl-colored pantsuit paired with a glossy top and American flag lapel pin.

“White, once the color of women’s purity, now the color of female power,” tweeted New York Times investigative reporter Jodi Kantor.

Women have dressed in white before as an emblem of history: During President Trump’s State of the Union address last year, many of the female lawmakers wore white.

Saturday night, Harris spoke about being a first among women; a daughter of Jamaican and Indian immigrants, she is now the highest-ranking woman in politics in the nation’s history.

“While I might be the first woman in this office, I won’t be the last,” Harris said, “because every little girl watching tonight sees that this is a country of possibilities.”

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Janet L. Yellen and Avril Haines are poised to be first women to lead treasury and national intelligence

These women don’t share political beliefs, but they do share post-election anxiety

Much of their apprehension is rooted in what fellow Americans could do

Arizona surprised the nation in the presidential election. Native voters are part of the reason, these activists say.

Local Indigenous organizers bridged the distance between their communities and the polls