Discussion of news topics with a point of view, including narratives by individuals regarding their own experiences

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Living with an invisible illness like endometriosis can mean constantly doubting your symptoms. I was always wondering if I was just being overly sensitive. But I’m not sensitive; once, I broke my arm and didn’t see a doctor for a week because it didn’t hurt that badly. I wasted time doubting myself and spent years feeling very sick and spending money to treat symptoms that were clear signs of endometriosis. Thanks to the kindness of a stranger, and an online resource hub created by a former nurse, I found the information I needed to get back on my feet.

March marks Endometriosis Awareness Month. The illness is brutal, and it affects 1 in 10 women of reproductive age, according to Endometriosis UK. On average, it takes 7.5 years for women to receive an accurate diagnosis. I hope that more women gain access to the resources they need to get better.

Editor’s note: An earlier version of this comic that was featured in the Lily Lines Thursday newsletter suggested that there is only one effective treatment for endometriosis. A number of medical sources suggest that other treatments may be effective as well.

During the summer, dappled sunlight transports me back in time. Here’s how.

Suddenly I’m 13 again, waiting for my mom to pick me up from swim practice

I say ‘I’m sorry’ way too much. I’m refusing to do so anymore — and I challenge other women to do the same.

Refusing to over-apologize doesn’t make women rude

I work as an art tutor for high schoolers. The way they choose to portray female bodies is deeply worrying.

It’s easy to help students with skills — but more difficult to change their perceptions of beauty