According to an investigative report reviewed by the Sun Herald, members of the George County Sheriff’s Department in Mississippi arrived at the home of state Rep. Douglas McLeod around 9 p.m. Saturday after receiving a call about an assault. Deputies were met by McLeod who, the Herald said, was stumbling, speaking with slurred speech and holding an alcoholic beverage.

Inside, McLeod’s wife was shaking and upset and claimed that her husband “just snapped.”

Now, Mississippi lawmakers are calling for McLeod’s resignation.

The investigation led local law enforcement to believe that the 58-year-old Republican politician punched his wife, causing her nose to bleed, the Sun Herald reported the document said. Deputies also observed blood in the couple’s bedroom.

McLeod, who did not return a request for comment, was taken into police custody Saturday evening and charged with a domestic violence-related misdemeanor.

In response to his arrest, Mississippi officials — Democrats and Republicans — asked the state representative to step down.

Sen. David Blount (D-Miss.) tweeted Tuesday: “Rep. McLeod should resign.”

Mississippi House Speaker Philip Gunn (R) made a similar statement Tuesday, requesting that McLeod vacate the position “if in fact, these allegations are true,” the Herald reported.

"These actions are unacceptable for anyone,” Gunn said.

The state’s Republican Party chairman, Lucien Smith, called for McLeod to “resign immediately,” if the allegations are true, the Clarion Ledger reported.

“Violence in any relationship is unacceptable, and I condemn this conduct in the strongest possible terms,” he said in a statement Tuesday night.

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